Welcome to Serenity Sunday. We Celebrate You!

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Dear Readers,

Welcome to Serenity Sunday. We encourage you to always tell you story, boldly, proudly and as often as you can. Have a great day.

Serenity Sunday Week 3 - Brene Brown

Fondly,
Monique

 

Come and Meet Our New Trailblazers

Dear Readers,

Have you ever met a girl who aspired to be a model when she was ‘all grown up?’ Can you remember seeing her eyes and face light up as she sashayed across the living room floor; which had the distinction of serving as her runway. If you answered yes, then you are not alone. If asked, I believe many parents and guardians have a similar story to tell.

Many of these young ladies are among today’s leading models. However there are others who would not realize their dream owing to many roadblocks, including: financial constraints, height and weight challenges, mobility issues and age.

I am pleased to report the landscaping is shifting. Today I have the pleasure of presenting The Incredible Women Changing Fashion Week Forever whose stories were beautifully presented by Lauren Valenti for Marie Claire magazine. Each brave woman has her own unique set of challenges: Winne Harlow is a model who also has vitiligo, Karen Crispo is a model and a quadruple-amputee, Jillian Mercado is an aspiring model who has spastic muscular dystrophy, Madeline Stuart and Jamie Brewer are popular models who also have Down syndrome. We are proud to feature these beautiful Legends as a part of our Tenacious Tuesday series. To read the full story, please follow this link.

Come and meet our new trailblazers.

After reading this article I am so proud of these ladies for following their paths, and Ms. Valenti for bringing their story to life. Hopefully we will be seeing more beautiful women, whom we can relate to on a more personal level, grace the runway during New York Fashion Week.

Have a great day!

Fondly,

Monique

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Credits: Marie Claire Magazine

Time to Reconnect

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Brooklyn Botanic Garden ©Shutterstock

Dear Readers,

Greetings from Brooklyn Legends.  We have missed connecting with during this brief hiatus.  As summer is almost over, it is now time to get back to work.

So much has happened in our beloved Brooklyn, throughout New York City and the world.  While we can all agree to experiencing some very good days, the recent tragic events demand that we acknowledge our nation’s struggles around several issues, including: acceptance, equality and justice.  As with all challenges we, collectively and as individuals, will continue to find ways to endure.

Brooklyn Legends is committed to being a part of your good days.  We will continue to celebrate the achievements of Brooklyn women from the African diaspora and recognize the stellar accomplishments of women throughout the world. We are also preparing inspirational moments to share with you in addition to our blog posts. So please stay tuned and get ready for a busy and productive Fall.

Fondly,

Monique

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Credits:
Image of Fall from Shutterstock.

On Memorial Day – To Love, Honor and Cherish

single-red-roseDear Readers,

I recently came across two photographs that many military and veteran’s wives share with each other as Memorial Day comes near.

Captured by photographer Todd Heisler for his 2005 award-winning series “Jim Comes Home” for The Rocky Mountain News, these photos show the return of Second Lieutenant Jim Cathey, a Marine who lost his life in Iraq, as his young widow Katherine Cathey, prepares for his burial.

In the first photo Mrs. Cathey, who is pregnant, spends the night before his burial in front of his casket. She has a laptop so she can listen to songs that remind her of her husband. A Marine stands guard over both of them.

In the second photo we see Lieutenant Cathey’s casket being unloaded from the cargo hold of an airplane. We also see the faces of the passengers as they peer through the window.

No words could ever take away this painful moment in Mrs. Cathey’s life. How many women (and men) have experienced this devastating loss? How many more will there be?

Brooklyn Legends salutes the women and men who have paid the ultimate price for the freedom we enjoy.

Fondly,
Monique

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Credit
As Memorial Day Nears, a Single Image That Continues to Haunt, Lily Burana, The New York Times, May 25, 2012

Saluting Women’s History Month & Dr. Josephine English

Dear Readers,

We are pleased to join the world in celebrating Women’s History Month. Sharing the important contributions of Brooklyn women from the African diaspora, and the accomplishments of women throughout the world, has motivated me to look for ways to make an impact on young ladies in my community.  What will be my legacy for the future?  How can I engage others?

Dr. Josephine English - NY Dailynews.com

Dr. Josephine English – NY Dailynews.com

Today I am pleased to tell you about the historical achievements of Dr. Josephine English – one of the first African-American women to have an OB/GYN practice in New York and one of Brooklyn’s earliest medical pioneers.

Dr. English was a tireless community leader, patron of the arts and philanthropist.  Most important of all, she was a wonderful mother to her children, and earned a reputation as a highly coveted OB/GYN to Brooklyn residents and notables, including Dr. Betty Shabazz, wife of Malcolm X.

Dr.English's home - via www.ohny.org

Dr.English’s home – via http://www.ohny.org

Dr. English was born on December 17, 1920, in Virginia, and she died on December 18, 2011 in Brooklyn, NY, one day after her 91st birthday.  Although she lived in Bedford Stuyvesant for many years, she would spend her last days at the Dr. Susan Smith McKinney Nursing & Rehabilitation Center, where she was recovering after undergoing a surgical procedure.

Dr. Susan McKinney via Blackpast.org

Dr. Susan McKinney via Blackpast.org

As I was preparing this post, I wondered wouldn’t it be great if Dr. English had an opportunity to meet Dr. McKinney? Picture a room where Dr. English, a recent graduate from Meharry Medical College who was now living in Brooklyn, could sit and talk with Dr. McKinney, the esteemed Brooklyn native who was the first African-American woman to earn an MD degree in New York State and the third woman to earn an MD degree in the United States.  Can you just imagine the stories they would share?  As medical pioneers with their own series of “firsts,” in addition to their personal and professional triumphs and challenges, I envision a conversation filled with many “aha” moments.

Dr. English spent her childhood years in New Jersey.  Her parents were among the first African-American families to settle in Englewood.  She received a B.A. from Hunter College in 1939 and continued her education at New York University where she received a M.A. in Psychology.  After NYU, she attended Meharry Medical College and received her M.D. in 1949.  Dr. English was ready to make her mark on the world.  Her first stop was Harlem Hospital, where she worked for many years until she moved to Brooklyn in 1956.

Dr. English was a trailblazer who reached back to help others who were in need.  She was among our borough’s earliest women philanthropists who championed the importance of health care for women, men and children.  Shortly after moving to Brooklyn, she founded a Women’s Community Health Clinic in Bushwick.  In 1979, she founded the Adelphi Medical Center which provided services for women and men.

On stage at the Paul Robeson Theater via - www.northjersey.com

On stage at the Paul Robeson Theater via – http://www.northjersey.com

Dr. English loved the theater and she was determined to share her passion for the arts with the community.  In 1980, decades after opening many medical clinics, she purchased an abandoned church and converted it to the Paul Robeson Theater for the Performing Arts.

One year later, in 1981, Dr. English turned her sights to services for children and opened Up The Ladder Day Care and After-School Program which included a summer day camp.  In 1986, she became the first minority, and the first woman, to be awarded a license from the New York State Department of Health to develop a free-standing ambulatory surgical center in Brooklyn.

Dr. English worked well beyond what was considered to be retirement age.  She focused intently on her goals and did not let anything stand in her way.  She changed the health-care landscape for women, men and families, in Brooklyn by providing access to health education and empowering her patients to make healthy life-style choices.  She was a guiding force in Brooklyn and one of our brightest stars.  Her achievements are legendary and it is an honor to salute her.

Dr. English will be truly missed.

Fondly,
Monique

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Credits:
Josephine English, one of the first back, female OB/GYNs not stopping at 89 – nydailynews.com
Dr. Josephine English, 91 via Northjersey.com
Dr. Josephine English, Medical Trailblazer dies at 91 – via www1.cuny.edu
Dr. Josephine English, The HistoryMakers via http://www.thehistorymakers.com

We Celebrate Women’s History Month and Empower Young Women & Girls

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Dear Readers,

As we continue to applaud the achievements of women around the globe, we must embrace young women and girls as they make their way in the world.

Despite our “busyness” we must advocate for needs of our younger sisters as often, and as loudly, as we can.  Our commitment to empowering the next generation is truly a collaborative effort — one that will require great resources if we are to succeed.  This endeavor is not without its challenges, but I am confident that we can do this.

Leymah Gbowee - via Mic.com

Leymah Gbowee – via Mic.com

I opened today’s post with a video by Leymah Gbowee, the Liberian activist and 2011 Nobel Peace Laureate, who shares the story of her personal transformation and implores us to find ways to unlock the untapped potential of girls.  If you are reading this post on your smart phone or table, and cannot see the video, please follow this link to the Ted Talks website. Once there, type Leymah Gbowee into the site’s search engine.

Here is a brief overview of Ms. Gbowee’s amazing achievements from Mic.com.

Liberian activist Leymah Gbowee was sick of enduring the civil war that had been ravaging her country since 1999. Using her education in peace studies and in collaboration with the organization Women in Peacebuilding Network, Gbowee led a mass women’s movement of peaceful protests and strikes. The group also enacted a now-infamous sex strike, in which many Liberian women refused to sleep with their partners until peace was achieved.

The movement culminated in Gbowee and her comrades daringly holding the delegates responsible for peace talks hostage until they reached an agreement. Harnessing the power of women banning together and the tactic of peace, Gbowee successfully helped bring the Second Liberian Civil War to an end in 2003. “It’s time for women to stop being politely angry,” Gbowee once said.  Thankfully, Gbowee continues to lead by example and loudly continues to demand justice, through writing, speaking and her work with the Gbowee Peace Foundation.

Brooklyn Legends is pleased to join with the Gbowee Peace Foundation, and organizations world-wide, in advancing the cause of women and girls. We hope that you will join us in this endeavor.  There is plenty of work to do.

Fondly,
Monique

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Credits:
50 Years From Now, Here Are the Trailblazing Women We’ll Be Celebrating as Poineers – via Mic.com
Leymah Gordon’s speech – Unlock the Intelligence of Women and Girls – via Ted.com

Celebrating Women & Cracking the Confidence Code

Dear Readers,

Women throughout the world have made tremendous personal and professional accomplishments.  As leaders in our homes and in our communities, in business and industry, we continue to emerge as trail blazers and change agents.

Yet, in spite of all that we have achieved, many statisticians confirm we have a long way to go before achieving parity with our male counterparts.

In May 2014, The Atlantic Magazine published The Confidence Gap; a poignant article written by Katty Kay and Claire Shipman, that gives key reasons why women do not ascend to executive leadership status at the same rate as men.

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In The Atlantic Magazine article, Ms. Kay and Ms. Shipman share the following insights:

And yet, as we’ve worked, ever diligent, the men around us have continued to get promoted faster and be paid more.  The statistics are well-known: at the top, especially, women are nearly absent, and our numbers are barely increasing.  Half a century since women first forced open the boardroom doors, our career trajectories still look very different from men’s.

Evidence shows that women are less self-assured than men— and that to succeed, confidence matters as much as competence.

Despite our achievements, we often resist owning just how great we are. When I was growing up, it was seen as “inappropriate” for girls and women to be seen and noticed.  Such behavior was considered to be brash and arrogant.  As a result I, and countless girls and women, had to navigate the world with fear and trepidation.  There were times when I felt obligated to downplay who I was, and apologize for the ideals I held.

IMG_0161When you have a moment, I encourage you to read the entire article by following this link.  At the start of today’s post, I included a brief video of our author’s conversation about The Confidence Code.

Please remember that we love hearing from you and would love to know what you think.

Fondly,
Monique
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Credits:
The Confidence Gap – The Atlantic Magazine, May 2014
The Confidence Code by Kitty Kay and Claire Shipman

A Plea for Gender Equality – International Women’s Day 2015

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Dear Readers,

UN Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka makes a plea to “all countries to ‘step it up’ for gender equality.”

At Brooklyn Legends we celebrate the achievements of amazing women from the African diaspora everyday.  It is our privilege to join the world in celebrating International Women’s Day, and to add our voice to the plea for gender equality.  Won’t you join us?

Please take a few moments to follow today’s conversation on Twitter @womensday or @Women_on_IWD.

Fondly,
Monique

Celebrating International Women’s Day & Women’s History Month

Dear Readers,

Welcome to Women’s History Month!  The past few weeks have been filled with appointments and deadlines that would not let up.  Please know that I truly miss connecting with you, and I am glad to be back on track. During recent conversations with some of my sister-friends, we each shared a common feeling — time is speeding by and we are racing to catch up.  We have so much to do.  Yet, as hard as we work, we continue to feel as if very little is getting done.  Of course these feelings are simply an illusion.

The important contributions that we make — as wife, mother, nurturer or caretaker; entrepreneur, trusted colleague, advisor or volunteer; community leader, change agent or visionary — underscore the value we have added to contemporary society and throughout history.  While our contributions may not always receive public fanfare or recognition, the appreciation we receive, from those we have helped along this journey, is priceless.

At Brooklyn Legends we celebrate the achievements of amazing women from the African diaspora everyday.  We are thrilled to join the world in celebrating International Women’s Day, which is today, Sunday, March 8th, and Women’s History Month, which lasts throughout March.

Julieanna Richardson - via Chicagomag.com

Julieanna Richardson – via Chicagomag.com

Recently, I read an interesting article, The Insider: Julieanna Richardson, Founder of The HistoryMakers, on the #Blackgivesback blog.  This article provided the perfect segue for our Women’s History Month salute.

Founded in 1999, “The HistoryMakers is a leader in helping to educate and enlighten millions worldwide through refashioning a more inclusive record of American history.”  Ms. Richardson has changed the conversation with the impressive video interviews she has conducted to document the lives of African-Americans, their triumphs and challenges.  To read the entire article from the #Blackgivesback blog please click here.  To experience the priceless treasures on The HistoryMakers site, please follow this link.

Ms. Richardson and her team have also interviewed some phenomenal women from Brooklyn.  The photo montage at the start of today’s post, provides a glimpse of some of these trailblazers.  As we celebrate Women’s History Month, it will be my privilege to share more information with you about each of these Legends.  We invite you to join us as we recognize:

  • Dr. Josephine English, a medical pioneer and the first African-American woman to have an OB/GYN practice in the state of New York.  Dr. English died in 2012 at the age of 91 years old.
  • Ernesta Procope, an entrepreneur who used her business savvy to grow her insurance and real estate business from a small storefront in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn to the first minority-owned company on Wall Street.
  • Rev. Julie Johnson Staples, who prior to her career as an ordained minister worked as: a journalist, a Wall Street finance executive and a correspondent for the Justice Department and the U.S. Supreme Court.
  • Lynn Nottage, a Pulitzer Prize winning playwright, screenwriter, Associate Professor of Theater at Columbia University and lecturer at Yale University.
  • Bethann Hardison, a trailblazing model and businesswoman, an outspoken advocate for greater representation of people of color in the modeling industry and creator of The Black Girls Collective.
  • Rosalyn Terborg-Penn, Ph.D., an American historian and author, who focuses on early African-American history and African-American women’s history, who is also a Professor Emerita at Morgan State University.

As you can see, we have a great deal in store for March.  We invite you to continue this journey with us.

Enjoy your day!
Monique

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Credits:

Information about Ms. Richardson and The HistoryMakers comes from the Black Gives Back Blog – http://www.Blackgivesback.com
The HistoryMakers – http://www.historymakers.com
Dr. Josephine English – The History Makers and City University of New York, www1.cuny.edu
Ernesta Procope – The History Makers and Black Enterprise Magazine, blackenterprise.com
Rev. Julie Johnson Staples – The History Makers and The Riverside Church, http://www.theriversidechurchny.org
Lynn Nottage – The History Makers and Lynn Nottage, http://www.lynnnottage.com
Bethann Hardison – The History Makers and Elle Magazine, http://www.elle.com
Rosalyn Terborg-Penn – The History Makers and BWHxG – Cross Generational Dialogues in Black Women’s History

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We Celebrate Dr. King and You

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Dear Readers,

From time to time, we each need to be reminded just how important our contributions are.  We may not have a public platform, but what each of us has to offer has a greater impact than we could ever realize.

As we recognize the 86th birthday of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., I wanted to share this video on the Dignity of Labor with you.

As you go about your plans to celebrate Dr. King’s legacy, please remember to celebrate yourself, and each other!

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Marketingartfully.com via the Seattle Times

Fondly,
Monique