My Motivational Monday Reading List

Dear Readers,

Today is Motivational Monday at Brooklyn Legends. For the past few weeks, it has been a privilege to share with you inspirational quotes and other words of encouragement at the start of the work week.

Today, for a change of pace, I would like to share a some books and magazines that have truly inspired (and motivated) me at various points in my life. Perhaps there is a book here that you would like to add to your reading list..

Have a great evening.
Monique

My Motivational Reading List
Success Attraction Notes & Quotes – Dr. Stacia Pierce
Think and Grow Rich – Napoleon Hill
What I Know for Sure – Oprah Winfrey
More Magazine – Meredith Corporation
The Warmth of Other Suns – Isabel Wilkerson
Outliers – Malcolm Gladwell

 

Celebrating Women & Cracking the Confidence Code

Dear Readers,

Women throughout the world have made tremendous personal and professional accomplishments.  As leaders in our homes and in our communities, in business and industry, we continue to emerge as trail blazers and change agents.

Yet, in spite of all that we have achieved, many statisticians confirm we have a long way to go before achieving parity with our male counterparts.

In May 2014, The Atlantic Magazine published The Confidence Gap; a poignant article written by Katty Kay and Claire Shipman, that gives key reasons why women do not ascend to executive leadership status at the same rate as men.

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In The Atlantic Magazine article, Ms. Kay and Ms. Shipman share the following insights:

And yet, as we’ve worked, ever diligent, the men around us have continued to get promoted faster and be paid more.  The statistics are well-known: at the top, especially, women are nearly absent, and our numbers are barely increasing.  Half a century since women first forced open the boardroom doors, our career trajectories still look very different from men’s.

Evidence shows that women are less self-assured than men— and that to succeed, confidence matters as much as competence.

Despite our achievements, we often resist owning just how great we are. When I was growing up, it was seen as “inappropriate” for girls and women to be seen and noticed.  Such behavior was considered to be brash and arrogant.  As a result I, and countless girls and women, had to navigate the world with fear and trepidation.  There were times when I felt obligated to downplay who I was, and apologize for the ideals I held.

IMG_0161When you have a moment, I encourage you to read the entire article by following this link.  At the start of today’s post, I included a brief video of our author’s conversation about The Confidence Code.

Please remember that we love hearing from you and would love to know what you think.

Fondly,
Monique
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Credits:
The Confidence Gap – The Atlantic Magazine, May 2014
The Confidence Code by Kitty Kay and Claire Shipman

Celebrating International Women’s Day & Women’s History Month

Dear Readers,

Welcome to Women’s History Month!  The past few weeks have been filled with appointments and deadlines that would not let up.  Please know that I truly miss connecting with you, and I am glad to be back on track. During recent conversations with some of my sister-friends, we each shared a common feeling — time is speeding by and we are racing to catch up.  We have so much to do.  Yet, as hard as we work, we continue to feel as if very little is getting done.  Of course these feelings are simply an illusion.

The important contributions that we make — as wife, mother, nurturer or caretaker; entrepreneur, trusted colleague, advisor or volunteer; community leader, change agent or visionary — underscore the value we have added to contemporary society and throughout history.  While our contributions may not always receive public fanfare or recognition, the appreciation we receive, from those we have helped along this journey, is priceless.

At Brooklyn Legends we celebrate the achievements of amazing women from the African diaspora everyday.  We are thrilled to join the world in celebrating International Women’s Day, which is today, Sunday, March 8th, and Women’s History Month, which lasts throughout March.

Julieanna Richardson - via Chicagomag.com

Julieanna Richardson – via Chicagomag.com

Recently, I read an interesting article, The Insider: Julieanna Richardson, Founder of The HistoryMakers, on the #Blackgivesback blog.  This article provided the perfect segue for our Women’s History Month salute.

Founded in 1999, “The HistoryMakers is a leader in helping to educate and enlighten millions worldwide through refashioning a more inclusive record of American history.”  Ms. Richardson has changed the conversation with the impressive video interviews she has conducted to document the lives of African-Americans, their triumphs and challenges.  To read the entire article from the #Blackgivesback blog please click here.  To experience the priceless treasures on The HistoryMakers site, please follow this link.

Ms. Richardson and her team have also interviewed some phenomenal women from Brooklyn.  The photo montage at the start of today’s post, provides a glimpse of some of these trailblazers.  As we celebrate Women’s History Month, it will be my privilege to share more information with you about each of these Legends.  We invite you to join us as we recognize:

  • Dr. Josephine English, a medical pioneer and the first African-American woman to have an OB/GYN practice in the state of New York.  Dr. English died in 2012 at the age of 91 years old.
  • Ernesta Procope, an entrepreneur who used her business savvy to grow her insurance and real estate business from a small storefront in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn to the first minority-owned company on Wall Street.
  • Rev. Julie Johnson Staples, who prior to her career as an ordained minister worked as: a journalist, a Wall Street finance executive and a correspondent for the Justice Department and the U.S. Supreme Court.
  • Lynn Nottage, a Pulitzer Prize winning playwright, screenwriter, Associate Professor of Theater at Columbia University and lecturer at Yale University.
  • Bethann Hardison, a trailblazing model and businesswoman, an outspoken advocate for greater representation of people of color in the modeling industry and creator of The Black Girls Collective.
  • Rosalyn Terborg-Penn, Ph.D., an American historian and author, who focuses on early African-American history and African-American women’s history, who is also a Professor Emerita at Morgan State University.

As you can see, we have a great deal in store for March.  We invite you to continue this journey with us.

Enjoy your day!
Monique

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Credits:

Information about Ms. Richardson and The HistoryMakers comes from the Black Gives Back Blog – http://www.Blackgivesback.com
The HistoryMakers – http://www.historymakers.com
Dr. Josephine English – The History Makers and City University of New York, www1.cuny.edu
Ernesta Procope – The History Makers and Black Enterprise Magazine, blackenterprise.com
Rev. Julie Johnson Staples – The History Makers and The Riverside Church, http://www.theriversidechurchny.org
Lynn Nottage – The History Makers and Lynn Nottage, http://www.lynnnottage.com
Bethann Hardison – The History Makers and Elle Magazine, http://www.elle.com
Rosalyn Terborg-Penn – The History Makers and BWHxG – Cross Generational Dialogues in Black Women’s History

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Truly Phenomenal – Remembering Dr. Maya Angelou

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Remembering Dr. Maya Angelou – one of the world’s most Phenomenal Women!

With fondness,
Monique

 

Remembering Dr. Maya Angelou – A Beacon of Hope & Truth

Dear Readers,

A few minutes ago we lost a great intellectual, a leader, seeker of truth and a great visionary – Dr. Maya Angelou.

Like many of you, I grew up listening to, and often reciting, Dr. Angelou’s great poems.  She entered my life at that awkward time when I needed a role model to look up to.    Of course there was my mother, and many strong women who helped her to raise me, but I also longed to model a wise woman who I could add to my inner circle.  Dr. Angelou was this person for me.

Whenever I would sit and read  I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, Life for Me Ain’t Been No Crystal Stair, Phenomenal Woman, and Still I Rise, the world somehow seemed better.  It was as if everything, and everyone, was kinder and easier to understand.  There is true power in the written word.

I came across Dr. Angelou’s interview with Bobby Jones titled The Mask and I wanted to share it in her honor.

Brooklyn Legends joins the world in mourning the loss of Dr. Maya Angelou.  Thank you dear Maya.  You will always be a beacon for many of us.

Rest in Peace.

Monique

Brooklyn – The City of Promise for Jamaican Writers

Dear Readers,

This article, For Jamaican Writers, New Place of Opportunity Is in Brooklyn, was written by Christina Brown for the Huffington Post, October 2013.

As an aspiring author, I was intrigued by Ms. Brown’s story.  Frequently, I receive e-mails from many of our readers who are looking for encouragement on how to start their writing projects, tips on how to stay motivated and general information about the process.  I am always flattered when I receive these notes; especially since I too am a writer in training. Ms. Brown’s article does not provide an overview of the writing process from beginning to end.  However, as a Brooklynite, I found myself relating to many of the illustrations she provided and the authors too!  I thought you might enjoy reading it.  As always, please let us know what you think.

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For Jamaican Writers, New Place of Opportunity Is in Brooklyn
Christina Brown – Huffington Post, October 2, 2013

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The smell of Jamaican patties and jerk chicken and the sounds of the West Indies Patois were very much in evidence during the annual Brooklyn Book Festival. Both cuisine and the language were a reflection of the popularity of Caribbean writers in general, and Jamaicans in particular, in the Brooklyn literary scene. On one night of the festival, at least 75 people lined the gallery at MoCADA, or the Museum of Contemporary African Diaspora Art, to hear West Indian-born writers, including Diana McCaulay and Ifeona Fulani, both from Jamaica, wax poetic about how the cultural landscapes of Jamaica and America have influenced their material.

Buoyed by interest from American publishers and perhaps more importantly, readers who reflect the city’s consistent growth of Caribbean immigrants, a new generation of writers from Jamaica, is finding literary, if not financial, success. “We have to be happy that we have space at the table and happy that someone is willing to engage your part of the narrative,” said E. Wayne Johnson, 45, a Jamaican arts and literary enthusiast who has lived in Brooklyn for more than 20 years. Johnson is Arts Director of the Caribbean Cultural Theatre and helped organize the MoCADA event, held on September 19, which featured seven authors from the Caribbean, including McCaulay and Fulani, reading excerpts from their books. “We as a community are not consumers of our own work or culture. It might sound parochial, [but] the harsh reality of internationally successful writers has made it, because they were a big thing somewhere else,” said Johnson, with a soft but distinctive West Indian lilt.

Census data show Jamaicans account for nearly 200,000 of New York City’s Caribbean immigrants. Making them the third largest group among those foreign-born, surpassed only by people from the Dominican Republic and China. Excited by the opportunity to interact with readers and writers from the Caribbean, McCaulay flew from her hometown in Kingston, Jamaica, to participate in the book reading. She also joined a panel discussion at St. Francis College, on Sunday, September 22, to promote her second novel, Huracan. “I [like] reading to my own people … my book is about leaving and going home,” said McCaulay on Thursday night. The main character in her book grapples with returning to Jamaica after a loss in the family, a sentiment McCaulay believes her audience should readily understand.

Nicole Dennis-Benn & Dr. Emma Benn - ebony.com

Nicole Dennis-Benn & Dr. Emma Benn – ebony.com

Nicole Dennis-Benn, 32, originally from Jamaica, now a writing professor at the College of Staten Island, came to the festival to connect both with readers and other writers. Her novel, Run Free, about a transgender Jamaican boy is set to be published next year. “As a writer myself, it’s important for me to have a relationship with other Jamaican authors, especially given Diana McCaulay is [known] to write outside of the box,” said Dennis-Benn, with her wife Emma by her side.

Despite the population numbers that seem to illustrate a picture that Brooklyn is filled with people who may be able to identify with the characters in the poems, novels and stories of Jamaican writers, “It’s not like it’s a lucrative business,” said Johnny Temple, founder of independent publisher Akashic Books, and chair of the Brooklyn Borough President’s Literary Council. Many of the authors supplement the income from their literary work with other jobs. McCaulay is an environmental activist in Jamaica, and runs the non-profit, Jamaica Environment Trust. “There’s lots of fantastic writers … a lot of publishing companies in Jamaica are getting more established,” Temple said on the last night of the weeklong festival, after wrapping up the last of 60 events from Sept. 16 to 22, that attracted 350 writers from across the U.S. as well as the international writing community.

Temple has been a key organizer of the annual Brooklyn Book Festival since its inception eight years ago. He said at least 10 writers participating this year were from the Caribbean. “It’s incredibly diverse,” said Temple. “There’s so many different types of stories to tell.” “I think the new Caribbean writing is much more immediate and edgy and grounded in the realities of Caribbean living today,” said McCaulay. “It doesn’t have this kind of misty veil over something lost in the past … it’s more grounded in contemporary Caribbean life and work.”

Oonya Kempadoo - commonwealthwriters.org

Oonya Kempadoo – commonwealthwriters.org

Alex Neptune settled in the U.S. 40 years ago, after leaving his home in Georgetown, Guyana. “I don’t read too many novels so when I do read, I want to make sure I’m going to finish the book that I’ve started,” said Neptune, after the talk at the MoCADA. He works in New York’s insurance and real estate industry and he wanted Oonya Kempadoo, the British born, but of Guyanese lineage author, of All Decent Animals, to sign his copy of her book. “I don’t have to think too much about what the writer is saying … when she expresses herself on different issues, I can relate,” said Neptune.

“How are you doing?” a woman asked E. Wayne Johnson, who was perspiring in his salmon colored button down shirt as he carried chairs, trying to determine where to add seats in the already packed gallery before the group, Caribbean Cultural Theatre, opened Thursday’s book reading. “Yeah mon, I’m goodish,” responded Johnson, in the Patois dialect commonly heard throughout Jamaica.  Largely regarded as a spoken language, Patois has over the past several years increasingly gained traction as a literary language.  But in some circles, according to the West Indian author Robert Antoni, 45, its use had been considered a reflection of one’s typically low socioeconomic class and status.

“We writers of the next generation have stood up, and embraced this language. It has taken over our writing. I think if anything characterizes West Indian language, West Indian novels, West Indian poetry, it’s been the embracing of the vernacular … the vernacular is always posited against another language. That language is what we call proper English, but the vernacular is a living thing and proper English is locked up in the dictionaries,” said Antoni.

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Credit
Article from The Huffington Post